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Talking about dying does not make it happen


Talking about death and dying can be a difficult and uncomfortable topic for many people. However, avoiding the topic altogether does not make it go away. In fact, talking about dying can have many benefits, including helping individuals to come to terms with their mortality, ensuring that their wishes are respected, and promoting open and honest communication with loved ones.


Despite these benefits, many people still fear that talking about dying will somehow make it happen. This belief, however, is simply not true.


The fear that talking about dying will somehow make it happen is rooted in a variety of cultural and psychological beliefs. In some cultures, death is viewed as a taboo topic that should not be discussed openly. In other cases, individuals may fear that talking about death will somehow hasten its arrival. This fear is often driven by a belief in the power of words and the idea that what we say has the power to shape our reality.


However, there is no scientific evidence to support the idea that talking about dying will make it happen. Death is a natural and inevitable part of the human experience, and while the timing and circumstances of our death may be uncertain, the fact of our eventual death is not. Talking about dying does not make it more likely to happen any sooner.


In fact, talking about dying can have many benefits for both the individual and their loved ones. For the individual, discussing their wishes for end-of-life care and funeral arrangements can help to ensure that their wishes are respected and that they receive the care they want and need. It can also provide an opportunity for the individual to reflect on their life and come to terms with their mortality.


For loved ones, talking about dying can help to ease the burden of decision-making during a difficult and emotional time. It can also promote open and honest communication, allowing loved ones to express their feelings and provide support to one another.


Furthermore, avoiding the topic of death can actually have negative consequences. By ignoring the reality of death, individuals may be unprepared for the end of life and may not have the opportunity to make their wishes known. This can lead to conflicts among family members and can result in care that does not align with the individual's values and beliefs.

It is important to recognize that talking about dying is not the same as wishing for it to happen. It is simply a recognition of the reality of the human experience and an opportunity to plan and prepare for the inevitable. By discussing their wishes for end-of-life care and funeral arrangements, individuals can ensure that their wishes are respected and that they receive the care they want and need.


In conclusion, talking about dying does not make it happen. While the fear of death is a common human experience, it is important to recognize that avoiding the topic altogether does not make it go away. Instead, talking about dying can have many benefits, including ensuring that an individual's wishes are respected, promoting open and honest communication among loved ones, and easing the burden of decision-making during a difficult time. By embracing the reality of our mortality and discussing our wishes for end-of-life care, we can ensure that we receive the care we want and need and that our loved ones are prepared for the end of life.

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Mimi Rothschild

Mimi Rothschild is the Founder and CEO of the Global Grief Institute which provides Certification training programs forGrief Coach, Trauma Coach, End of Life Coach, and Children's Grief Coach. She is a survivor who has buried 3 of her children and her husband of 33 years. She is available for speaking engagements and comments to the press on any issue surrounding thriving after catastrophic loss. MEDIA INQUIRIES: Info@GlobalGriefInstitute.com

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