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Doing the Best we Can


Everyone is making due with what they have at hand.


It's simple to look back on one's past and find fault; we often berate ourselves for the things we didn't do or were unsuccessful at, both personally and professionally. It's important to be kind and forgiving to our younger selves when we realize there are things we couldn't accomplish without the tools we have now. It's not fair to judge our younger selves as inferior just because our current selves are more experienced, knowledgeable, and well-equipped.


We realize that our younger selves had less opportunities, so we wouldn't dare criticize and feel embarrassed of our six-year-old self for their writing and grammatical mistakes or our five-month-old self for being so filthy they couldn't walk. Our teenage and adult selves, as well as our present and past selves, are deserving of the same kindness. Continually expanding our horizons has allowed us to amass a wealth of assets. Don’t condemn your prior self for what your present self is capable of.



WITH THE RIGHT MINDSET AND APPROACH, ANYTHING IS attainable.


The first time we try to imagine anything, we automatically discount it as impossible. If you had told six-year-old Buzz Aldrin that he would be the second man to set foot on the moon, he probably wouldn't have believed you. Barak Obama, when he was seven years old, probably wouldn't have believed you if you'd told him he'd be the first black president of the United States. The only reason individuals accomplish great things is because they tell themselves they can do it and then go out of their way to make it happen.


Even Buzz Aldrin and Barack Obama didn't know how to reach the moon or the Oval Office, but they figured it out eventually. They started out at the bottom and worked their way up, honing their skills in the areas that would most effectively prepare them to achieve their goals. They didn't find the solutions in a book or a dream; rather, they found them through personal development and effort. Similarly, that's how you'll realize your wildest ambitions. Don't let yourself become disheartened by your setbacks; learning from them is an integral element of moving forward.


GRIEF COACHING SHOULD INCREASE INDIVIDUAL MATURITY, DECISION-MAKING CAPABILITY, AND PERSONAL STRENGTH


What this is about is setting a shared objective that we will work together to achieve. If you're a life coach, chances are your clients have come to you because they're struggling with something emotionally, like depression, anxiety, stress, or low self-esteem. However, it's not your job to make them feel better; rather, it's your job to help them build a solid sense of who they are as an individual, so that they can deal with their feelings on their own. Instead of just making people feel better, it is our obligation to really make them better people.


Mimi Rothschild is the Founder and CEO of the Global Grief Institute which provides Certification training programs for Grief Coach, Trauma Coach,End of Life Coach,and Children's Grief Coach. She is a survivor who has buried 3 of her children and her husband of 33 years.She is available for authoritative comments to the press on any issue surrounding thriving after catastrophic loss.MEDIA INQUIRIES:Info@GlobalGriefInstitute.com



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Mimi Rothschild

Mimi Rothschild is the Founder and CEO of the Global Grief Institute which provides Certification training programs forGrief Coach, Trauma Coach, End of Life Coach, and Children's Grief Coach. She is a survivor who has buried 3 of her children and her husband of 33 years. She is available for speaking engagements and comments to the press on any issue surrounding thriving after catastrophic loss. MEDIA INQUIRIES: Info@GlobalGriefInstitute.com

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